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The traditional design of user interfaces for mobile phones is limited to a small interaction that provides only the necessary means to place phone calls or to write short messages. Such narrow activities supported via current terminals suppress the users from moving towards mobile and ubiquitous computing environments of the future. Unfortunately, the next generation of user interfaces for mobile terminals seems to apply the same design patterns as commonly used for desktop computers. Whereas the desktop environment has enough resources to implement such design, the capabilities of the mobile terminals fall under constrains dictated by mobility like the size or weight. Additionally, in the attempt to make mobile terminals available for everyone, the users should be able to operate them with minimal or no preparation, while for the users of desktop computers a certain training is usually required.

Mobile Augmented Reality Interface Sign Interpretation Language System
(MARISIL). A possible approach for future media phones user interfaces that can
apply to mobile devices.
Fig. 1 Mobile Augmented Reality Interface Sign Interpretation Language System (MARISIL). A possible approach for future media phones user interfaces that can apply to mobile devices.(big version). Copyright © 2004 Peter Antoniac.

This site is an insight of the research targeted to the improving of the user interface of future mobile devices by using a more human-centred design. One possible solution is to combine Augmented Reality technique with image recognition in such a way that it will allow the user to access a "virtualized interface" (see Fig. 1). Such interface is feasible since the user of an Augmented Reality system is able to see synthetic objects overlaying the real world. Overlaying user's sight and using image recognition process, the user interacts with the system using a combination of virtual buttons and hand gestures.

Warning: Part of the work described by this site is copyrighted or protected by US Patent 6,771,294 (found also at FreePatentsOnline).

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